Factbox: U.N. aviation conference agenda

Diplomats and aviation officials gather in Montreal Feb. 2-5 for a U.N. International Civil Aviation Organization High-Level Safety Conference after the deadliest year in civil aviation in nearly a decade.

The following are some of the main proposals on the agenda:

TRACKING PLANES

ICAO's Secretariat has asked members to endorse a proposed global flight tracking system called the Global Aeronautical Distress and Safety System, or GADSS, after the disappearance of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 last March on a flight to Beijing from Kuala Lumpur.

Aircraft would be required to report their locations at least once every 15 minutes, or every one minute during an emergency or potential emergency. That standard would likely be tightened over time.

The same plan calls for a new, separate "autonomous distress tracking system" that could be activated from the ground, and ejectable flight recorders. But it would take years to build - some of the requirements could go into effect as late as 2023.

WHO FINDS MISSING PLANES?

Australia, which has led a nearly year-long hunt for MH370, wants ICAO to clarify who should be responsible for such searches once rescue efforts are called off.

Australia set aside A$80-A$90 million last year for the search, already the most expensive ever undertaken. Malaysia has said it would split the costs.

FLIGHTS OVER WAR ZONES

The organization's Secretariat is proposing a new system to share information about risks to commercial aircraft flying over war zones after Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 was shot down in eastern Ukraine last year.

It is asking member states to approve a test website where states and agencies could publish public warnings about conflict zones. The United States would support the proposal, a significant backing given its large intelligence network and the diplomatic pressure Washington can put on other countries.

With no way to force countries to participate, or any plans to vet the information, the proposal falls well short of offering the comprehensive, consistent information airlines demanded after the downing of MH17.

Separately, Russia's Interstate Aviation Committee has called on ICAO's governing council to work with the United Nations Security Council and military authorities to detect and respond to threats to civil aviation.

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